New Study Indicates a Possible Skin Cancer and Smoking Link

New Study Indicates a Possible Skin Cancer and Smoking Link

This study just adds one more reason for people to serious try to quit the smoking habit.

The CDC reports that smoking increases your risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and respiratory disease. They also say that it increases your risk of developing several types of cancers, including bladder cancer, lung cancer, cancer of the voice box, cancer of the esophagus, kidney cancer, stomach cancer, uterine cancer, and cancer of the cervix.

Now a new report gives people another reason to quit the tobacco habit. A new study has reported a link between skin cancer and tobacco use.

The study, conducted at the University of South Florida and Moffitt Cancer Center, studied approximately 700 patients: 383 had skin cancer and 315 without. The results of the study, which are published in the Cancer Causes Control online journal, revealed that the more people smoked, the more the likelihood they had skin cancer.

Males who smoked had a modest risk of basal cell and squamous cell cancer, which are two types of non-melanoma skin cancer. Women who smoked were nearly twice as likely to develop the less aggressive form of squamous skin cancer.

While the study does reveal a link between skin cancer and smoking, there is no proven cause and effect. Men, it seems are more likely to develop skin cancer overall than women. Whether this is due to genetic or lifestyle is not known. Men may spend more time outdoors playing sports and they may tend to get more unprotected sun exposure during than lifetime than women.

This study just adds one more reason for people to serious try to quit the smoking habit.